B.C. government confesses to administrative mistake over gambling stats


The Gaming Policy and Enforcement Branch now admits it made an administrative mistake after it published a report that revealed Gaming Control Act violations increased by 735% last year.

The report for the year ended March 31, 2015 said GPEB tape-recorded 3,215 offenses, up from the 385 a year earlier. A representative for the gambling regulator stated there were in fact just 305 offenses in 2014-2015, which was a reduction of nearly 21%. None, however, was reported to Crown counsel, according to the report that was tabled at a May 17 budget price quotes hearing in the Legislature.

Brennan Clarke of the Ministry of Finance blamed the error on the addition of 2,910 event reports of voluntary self-exclusions, a classification that had actually been removed from the 2013-2014 report because it was deemed a B.C. Lottery Corporation obligation although it is discussed in the Gaming Control Act.

The exemption of VSEs and other prohibited customers in the 2013-14 report, and the notes explaining the change, were supposed to finish to the 2014-15 report, Clarke said. The intent was to continue reporting on that basis, and GPEB will report on that basis in next year as well.

Brennan stated, however, that the ministry is not able to offer a precise breakdown of the 305 offenses, which include unauthorized lotto schemes, offering lotto tickets to minors, and allowing minors into casinos.

Clarke would also not explain why the violations table is the only chart in the annual report that is not released with a year-over-year contrast.

Tabled May 17, the report was not instantly released. Mike de Jong, the finance minister in charge of gambling marketing and policy, apologized to NDP critic David Eby for the reports tardy release because it had been on his desk for several days. When it was published online, the report included a brand-new footnote stating the figures were revised, but not fixed.

Unlike the GPEB report, which is more than a year old, the BCLC-published report on VSEs revealed 9,652 incidents where security personnel recognized and ejected individuals through disqualified wins and acknowledgment technology. That was up from the 8,241 a year previously.

GPEB's decision not to include VSE statistics in its yearly report coincided with high-profile court cases in which gamblers slammed the program as a failure.

In July 2014, a B.C. Supreme Court judge ruled that BCLC needed to return jackpots withheld from left out gamblers in between April 2009 and June 2010.

The VSE program had actually operated since the late 1990s, prior to the Gaming Control Act.

However only in 2009 did BCLC begin to withhold jackpots.

HamidrezaHaghdust and Michael Lee sued BCLC to recover jackpot prizes of $35,000 and $42,484.67, respectively, that were won after they entered the exemption program in 2007. The plaintiffs had signed their forms prior to BCLC adopted jackpot privilege rules.

In a 2014 BCLC-commissioned report, it was approximated that 125,000 people in B.C. are problem gamblers with possible addictions. That suffices to fill B.C. Place Stadium twice and considerably inhabit Rogers Arena.

An RCMP team that specialized in targeting unlawful gambling was closed down by the BC Liberal federal government in 2009 in spite of cautioning that it had intelligence of cyclist gangs penetrating genuine gambling operations. In April, de Jong revealed a brand-new team, the Joint Illegal Gaming Investigation Team, would be formed with the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit. The federal government mentioned a spike in suspicious currency transactions at casinos to $20.7 million last July as a driver for the new team.


Teachers house turned into cyber gambling center


Police in the interior Keningau district are investigating how an instructor’s house became an illegal cyber gambling Centre.

Authorities uncovered the activities in Kampung Jaya Baru, about 3km from Keningau town, throughout a raid at about 9.30 pm on May 27.

Keningau OCPD Deputy Supt Douglas NyegingTaong said nine people, consisting of the recently utilized caretaker of the premises, were jailed throughout the raid.

He stated the instructor, who owned the house, was away from the district during the raid.

We understand his identity and we will be questioning him, DSP Douglas added.

He stated the caretaker had actually just been employed for 3 weeks.

Police seized 8 laptop and accessories, a modem and cash totaling RM1,243.

DSP Douglas stated initial investigations revealed that the cyber gambling Centre ran between 7pm and midnight.


'It impacts everyone': Kiwis legend raises awareness around issue gambling


The unpleasant combination of issue gambling and match-fixing with its destructive effects is pertaining to a movie theater near you thanks to a Kiwi league legend and his movie-making child.

Mark and Luke Graham are hoping the film Broke will raise awareness and aid addicts seek help.

"The reason by I made the movie is because there were individuals in my life that were going through these concerns along with those in the public eye," Luke stated.

"I think it is an illness to develop an awareness for."

The film, with short lived looks of Mark Graham in action, is about a league superstar with gambling and alcohol addictions who spend most of his time by drinking, trying new online betting system schemes and throwing away his money. And while it's not a biopic, there is reality behind the fiction.

The story is influenced by the life of former Bulldogs forward Ryan Tandy, who was banned from the NRL for match-fixing.

Tandy was banned for life and in 2014 was found dead from an evident drug overdose.

But meeting the headlines more recently is Kiwis five-eighth Kieran Foran, who is said to have actually dropped $75,000 in a two-hour gambling binge.

"All sports people that live for the minute, they have that devil might care ... that risk. One hundred percent danger for one hundred percent reward," stated Mark.

"So I am believing that's got a lot to do with it."

While developing awareness is essential, those with a gambling dependency need to understand they have an issue.

"When you influence your life and children, your life, family and everybody else that's the issue," said Luke.